Under the Iceberg
by The Art & Science of Medicine


An acrylic portrait depicting the repressed symptoms of a patient that embodies the clinical iceberg. Our aim is to show that not every patients' symptoms can be actively seen on the surface and that every person has individual barriers to seeking clinical help.


Katrina Ashford, Leah Bolchover, Alexander Cavenagh, Farai Chiwah, Lisa Dwyer-Joyce, Veronica Faluyi, Thomas Greenslade, Benjamin Hartshorn, Barakat Hussein, Julia Kan, Ahmad Khalaf
Collaborative Creative Pieces, Year One
Exhibited at the Foundations of Medicine Conference, November 2017

Comments

Charlotte Burgess

01 November 2018 - 21:06:31
"I particularly like the contrast in texture in this piece. The way the scratches and colour across the patients eyes appears almost violent seems to depict the inner turmoil people can face whilst appearing fine on the surface. I love the way the eyes are covered,I feel as if there's a barrier in communication between the subject and the viewer not dissimilar that between a patient and a doctor when only the tip of the iceberg has been uncovered. A very moving piece."

Jaisila Patel

04 November 2018 - 22:25:02
"This is a really beautiful piece. The harsh, chaotic brushstrokes covering the eyes starkly contrast the serene expression on the man’s face. Even those individuals who look okay on the surface may have underlying worries; every patient will have their own fears about getting help and it is the duty of a doctor to earn the trust of their patients and help them to overcome their own personal obstacles. The quotes cleverly illustrate the huge variety of potential barriers to access to healthcare services that people experience."

Ursila Zaman

04 November 2018 - 22:12:39
"I thoroughly enjoyed studying this piece. I feel as though it clearly encapsulates the intense feelings of uncertainty surrounding patients, both to themselves and to their physicians during the diagnosis stage of treatment. The blurred covering around the eyes is especially captivating as it shows how isolating life can be for a patient, when they are held back by a barrier, in this case: repressed symptoms. I feel as though this painting can be applied to the perspective of a physician, in attempting to diagnose and treat a patient, but finding it difficult to see the complete image, surrounding a particular case. "

Zara Cracroft

04 November 2018 - 22:12:39
"I like how the piece shows the importance of good doctor-patient relationships in order to break through individual barriers that can prevent patients from seeking help. The phrases written over the patient's eyes were powerful and the obstruction of the eyes is very effective."

Rachel Levy

04 November 2018 - 22:12:39
"This piece stands out to me because of the beautiful way it depicts such an important message - a patients presentation of symptoms often just scratches the surface of the real underlying problem. It also highlights the importance of a doctors tact and compassion in every consultation as if a patient doesn't reveal the full extent of a problem the doctor cannot possibly give the right advice. "

Max

04 November 2018 - 22:12:39
"Something I find particularly intriguing about this piece is the attention to detail regarding the ambiguity of the eyes. Something integral to non-verbal communication is eye movement and facial cues, and I think this piece really captivates how important seeing past dialogue and 'below the iceberg' is. Furthermore, the painting alludes to the difficult nature of seeing beyond just visual symptoms - often in healthcare so much of what a patient struggles with cannot be seen, this is further displayed by the aggressive style behind the distortion of the eyes."

Rachel Levy

04 November 2018 - 22:12:39
"This piece stands out to me because of the beautiful way it depicts such an important message - a patients presentation of symptoms often just scratches the surface of the real underlying problem. It also highlights the importance of a doctors tact and compassion in every consultation as if a patient doesn't reveal the full extent of a problem the doctor cannot possibly give the right advice. "