A Real Person Too

by Edward Toll

The pain I'm in, it isn't right,
All down my arm, it looks a sight.
Three days it's been, like burning hell,
And when I move, I scream and yell.


But will it stop, but will it clear?
The pain keeps building, and makes me fear!
I cannot sleep, I won't go out,
Should see a doctor, there's no doubt.


And so I arrive, although it's late,
Don't want my arm to be my fate.
But when I ask, I see their disgust,
I know they don't care, I know they mistrust.


Not just the staff, the patients too:
"He's a nasty man,"- they think it's true.
But no I sit, and wait and wait,
And all the time, regarded with hate.


I check the clock, a quarter to four,
I want to walk out through the door.
Another hit, that would be nice,
But with this arm, I'm thinking twice.


So then I'm seen, the staff judge fast,
No wonder I was waiting until last!
I try to say that this is serious,
My pain is making me delirious!


She looks at me, her eyes are mean,
"He just wants some free morphine!"
I plead with her, but it's no good,
I'm a drug addict, so misunderstood.


Sometimes I wish that they could see,
It isn't easy being me.
My leg isn't broken, I don't have the flu,
But can't I be treated like a real person too?

Edward Toll                                                Whole Person Care

Comments

Adeola Akindele

10 October 2017 - 07:31:06
"Truth so beautifully written"

Pippa Richardson

29 October 2017 - 22:00:52
"I think this perfectly describes the misconceptions and prejudices many people face in a health care system. It outlines that some health care professionals are very closed when it comes to the meaning of a disease, and how often a mental illness isn't seen as treatable - or it's seen as a choice. "

Pippa Richardson

29 October 2017 - 22:01:41
"I think this perfectly describes the misconceptions and prejudices many people face in a health care system. It outlines that some health care professionals are very closed when it comes to the meaning of a disease, and how often a mental illness isn't seen as treatable - or it's seen as a choice. "

T Pabary

04 November 2018 - 22:06:09
"This poem highlights how prevalent and hurtful stigmas around addiction are, and how important it is for any clinician to treat all patients with respect and care, and as the poem states, as a 'real person.' "

Maria

06 November 2018 - 09:30:49
"This incites a lot of thought into what clinicians define as "disease", and how some suffering is met with sympathy and others are met with scorn. The intimate bond between physical and mental health has no doubt been brewing for a long time, but it is poems like these that really highlight how clinicians need to look at the entire person before seeing a disease or a stigma. We preach impartiality but clinicians are still people and therefore prone to bias like any other human being. Removing that judgement can help us become better people as well as better doctors. "